Free Cookbooks By Mail

    cookbooks by

  • Chef Pierre Gagnaire

    free

  • Not or no longer confined or imprisoned
  • loose: without restraint; “cows in India are running loose”
  • Not under the control or in the power of another; able to act or be done as one wishes
  • (of a state or its citizens or institutions) Subject neither to foreign domination nor to despotic government
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; “free enterprise”; “a free port”; “a free country”; “I have an hour free”; “free will”; “free of racism”; “feel free to stay as long as you wish”; “a free choice”
  • grant freedom to; free from confinement

    mail

  • the bags of letters and packages that are transported by the postal service
  • A single delivery or collection of mail
  • send via the postal service; “I’ll mail you the check tomorrow”
  • Letters and packages conveyed by the postal system
  • The postal system
  • cause to be directed or transmitted to another place; “send me your latest results”; “I’ll mail you the paper when it’s written”

free cookbooks by mail

How to Make a Sundae

How to Make a Sundae
It was 1969. Cool Whip Topping had been on the market for only two years, and already it was an American Staple.

I always get a chuckle from these basic "how-to" recipes written for adults!

I found this nifty, groovy easel-style cookbook (you could mail-away for a free copy) at the Salvation Army in Green Bay, Wisconsin just 5 minutes before closing time (I knew I should have looked at the books first, but I was trying to abide by my husband’s "No More Junky Books Rule".

I love the fat, hand-drawn font titles. The colors are bright and the recipes are classic Kraft Foods, circa late 1960s, when we didn’t have so many hang-ups about our food’s chemical make-up! :)

Many of the recipes feature groovy, hip illustrations. Alas, the artist’s name is not listed…if you recognize the illustrator, please leave a comment.

The Well-Dressed Dessert

The Well-Dressed Dessert
It was 1969. Cool Whip Topping had been on the market for only two years, and already it was an American Staple.

I found this nifty, groovy easel-style cookbook (you could mail-away for a free copy) at the Salvation Army in Green Bay, Wisconsin just 5 minutes before closing time (I knew I should have looked at the books first, but I was trying to abide by my husband’s "No More Junky Books Rule".

I love the fat, hand-drawn font titles. The colors are bright and the recipes are classic Kraft Foods, circa late 1960s, when we didn’t have so many hang-ups about our food’s chemical make-up! :)

Many of the recipes feature groovy, hip illustrations. Alas, the artist’s name is not listed…if you recognize the illustrator, please leave a comment.


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